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Talking Bits

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Hey!

I'm back with an easy 29 steps guide to improve your blog audience and retain your visitors. See below all the ways to keep people coming back to your blog - or even your Facebook page - and then answer me:

 

What keeps YOU going back to others’ blogs?

 

  1. Teach me how to do something.
  2. Entertain me.
  3. Stimulate me to think.
  4. Tell me a story.
  5. Present me with some interesting research results.
  6. Make me laugh.
  7. Review a product or service to help me make a decision.
  8. Tell me why and how something applies to me.
  9. Show me a case study of something you’ve (or someone else has) done.
  10. Make me feel like I’m not the only one who….
  11. Predict what will happen next.
  12. Collate what other people say about….
  13. Inspire me.
  14. Give me a project to go away and do.
  15. Give me a sense of belonging.
  16. Explain what something means.
  17. Summarize a topic or issue.
  18. Intrigue me.
  19. Introduce me to someone of interest.
  20. Tell me your opinion.
  21. Link to something that I need to see or read.
  22. Share something I can relate to.
  23. Provide me with a list of resources.
  24. Stimulate me to enter into a dialogue or debate.
  25. Give me a point of view that is different from the rest.
  26. Encourage me to keep going through something I’m finding tough.
  27. Keep me up to date with the latest news or developments in a field of interest.
  28. Guide me through a process.
  29. Solve a problem that I have.
2

On February 2 around 4 a.m., the Internet will run out of its current version of IP addresses. At least that’s what one Internet Service Provider is predicting based on a rate of about one million addresses every four hours. Hurricane Electric has launched Twitter and Facebook accounts that count down to what it has termed the “IPcalypse.”

 

Every device that is connected to the Internet gets a unique code called an IP address (it looks like this). The current system, IPv4, only supports about 4 billion individual IPv4 addresses.

 

As PC World‘s Chris Head explained in a blog post yesterday, some of these addresses are reusable. The problem, however, is that their one-time use counterparts will eventually lead to the complete depletion of IP addresses.

 

Fortunately, some smart folks foresaw this problem long before we did and invented IPv6, a system that invokes both letters and digits to handle 340,282,366,920,938,463,463,374,607,431,768,211,456 addresses (shall we just call it “a zillion?”).

 

Hurricane Electric’s doomsday campaign encourages other Internet service providers to transition to that system. Fortunately, the Internet Society‘s Wiki assures us that IPv4 and IPv6 can coexist during the transition despite being largely incompatible. Software and hardware developers are working on transition mechanisms, and most operating systems install support for IPv6 by default.

 

Since many of us still have some canned food and bottled water stacked up in our basement from the Y2K era, we should be OK either way.

 

 

 

 

Source: Mashable

2

Social Media and Social CRM being so new, one is often asked the questionwhat is Social CRM and how is it different from “traditional” CRM?

 

Social CRM is the business strategy of engaging customers through Social Media with goal of building trust and brand loyalty. Loyalty is defined as attitude towards a brand that inclines a customer to repurchase it and/or recommend it to others.

 

Social CRM and Social Media are more about building trust and managing loyalty with customers than about managing relationships or transactions, which are focus areas of “traditional” CRM.

 

 

 

Let’s break-down the definition to its individual components:

 

1) Social CRM is the business strategy

 

It is not technology, tools or platform. Fundamentally, Social CRM is a business strategy. It is widely accepted by Social CRM practitioners and SMEs that Social CRM is a business strategy.

 

2) Engaging Customers through Social Media

 

Engagement through Social Media is the most important aspect of my definition. Any CRM related activity through existing channels like the telephone, email, snail mail etc.. will continue to be part of “traditional” CRM and will not be replaced by Social CRM (unless the Customer prefers to use Social Media instead of “traditional” channels).

 

Thus, Social CRM will augment “traditional” CRM, but will not replace it. And for some industries like health care or financial services, emphasis will continue to be more on “traditional” channels and not on Social ones for privacy related issues (who would want to tweet about their bank account or health condition). Traditional CRM channels will offer more private communication as compared to “public” Social CRM channels.

 

Having said Social CRM will augment traditional CRM and not replace it – let me add that Social CRM will be well integrated into overall CRM platform and systems with a 360 degree view of the Customer with feeds from all major Social channels. Customer will have a choice on what channels to use and organizations will reach out to the Customer based on that choice.

 

3) with goal of building trust and brand loyalty

 

Ultimate goal of Customer Engagement through Social Media is to build (a) Trust and (b) Brand Loyalty. I have used the word “Trust” before “Loyalty” for a reason because Social Media has introduced the “trust” dimension to marketing equation.

 

Before the Social Media age, Trust in marketing relationship was limited to face-to-face interactions (like friendly neighbourhood coffee shop or grocery shop). What Social Media has done is to make it possible for any one to have the same sort of one-to-one relationship irrespective of geography. This kind of one-to-one relationships based on mutual “trust” are not possible through “traditional” CRM channels like phone, mail or emails.

 

While “traditional” CRM helped manage Customer Relationships on a massive scale, it did not help in building mutual trust between buyers and sellers as it is impossible to build “trust” with thousands of customers over phone or mail. For building Trust, you need to know your partner well and not just be limited to mere “transactions” as was the case with “traditional” CRM. Social Media provides the opportunity to marketers to become “personal”, interact with thousands of customers spread across geography on one-to-one basis so that marketer and the customer get to know each other so well as to trust each other – the essence of a true relationship.

 

Second most important goal of Social CRM is to build Customer Loyalty – the ultimate goal of any business! Some have interpreted my definition as not being “customer focused” or “customer centric” or being “Social Media Centric”. This is not correct. The very fact that goal of Social CRM in my definition is to build Customer Loyalty implies that it is “Customer Centric” – as you cannot build loyalty without having a customer focus.

1

Americans are now spending as many hours online as they do in front of their TV screens, according to a survey released by Forrester on Monday.

 

The average American now spends roughly 13 hours per week using the Internet and watching TV offline, Forrester finds, based on its survey of more than 30,000 customers. The Internet has long captivated the attention of younger Americans to a greater extent than TV and is now proving more popular to Gen X (ages 31 to 44) for the first time ever. Younger Baby Boomers (ages 45 to 54) are spending the same amount of time per week using both media.

 

While the amount of time Americans spend watching TV has remained roughly the same in the past five years, Internet use has increased by 121% in the same time frame.

 

Readers will not be surprised to learn that Internet-connected mobile devices have aided this growth in Internet use. One-fourth of online mobile owners now log into the mobile Internet, largely through mobile websites, rather than apps.

 

So what are Americans doing online? Shopping, mostly. In a similar survey issued in 2007, a little more than one-third of online respondents said they were shopping online; now, 60% claim to do so. A little more than one-third also access social networking sites regularly, often through their mobile devices; two-thirds of Generation Yers report that they update a social networking profile at least once per month.

 

Blogging, listening to streaming audio and IMing prove far less popular, engaging one-third or less of the U.S. online population respectively.

In addition, Forrester expects that 2 million new households will be connected to the Internet by the end of the year compared to the end of 2009, and that 82% of households will have Internet by 2015. Broadband will have reached 5.5 million new households by the end of this year, meaning that more than 90% of connected households will have access to high speed Internet by the end of 2010.

 

Image courtesy of Forester

Source: Mashable

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Marcio Salles

Marcio Salles

Member since: Aug 17, 2010

Edelman Digital Executive, responsible for being the Face to many Books. That's my personal time, that's my work. So let's talk about 2.0 life!

View Marcio Salles's profile

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